Tuesday, May 22, 2007

Stop all Chinese Imports (and a bunch of links)

Are we in a cross-contaminated episode of "24" and "The Twilight Zone"? A bunch of things to make you go "oh-my-god-what-the-hell-are-we-doing?" (Thanks to Mike for most of the articles!)

Contaminated toothpaste from China from The New York Times (thanks Therese)

Making China clean up its act from a Washington Post reporter in The Star-Telegram

China trade reveals gaps in FDA system from The Chicago Tribune

From OpEdNews.com
“Mom! This food tastes funny…”

“Eat your poisoned food from China Tommy; it’s good for… um… the economy”.

As the story slowly unravels from the sluggish, mostly quiescent US press it turns out that China has been shipping toxic food products to the United States for years, and over-worked, under-funded federal inspectors have known all about it.
...
So all of you out there who are arguing in favor of libertarians and further deregulation, beware of what you wish for, you might just get a mouthful of toxins, with love, from China.

Our cats' and dogs' health could have been compromised long before tainted pet food was recalled. From The Wichita Eagle

China grapples with food contamination credibility crisis from International Herald Tribune

Weeks after tainted Chinese pet food ingredients killed and sickened thousands of dogs and cats in the United States, China faced growing international pressure to prove that its food exports were safe to eat.

But simmering beneath the surface is a thornier problem that worries Chinese officials: how do they assure the world that this is not a nation of counterfeits and that "Made in China" means well-made?

...

"We're now learning some of the dirty secrets behind this fast-growing economy"
...
"Still, doubts remain about the ability of Beijing to tackle what many experts see as rampant fraud in its booming economy, and a culture of counterfeiting."
...
"China is also pressing the United States and the European Union to accept imports of Chinese poultry products...." [yeah, just what we want, send more....]


Former China drug regulator on trial from the Prescott Herald

China‘s former top drug regulator went on trial Wednesday accused of taking bribes to approve untested medicine, including an antibiotic that killed at least 10 patients last year before it was taken off the market.

Dozens of people have died in Panama after taking medicine contaminated with a chemical traced to a Chinese company


The Good News - Some companies ARE paying attention:

Mission Foods and Tyson say NO to ingredients from Tyson
From The LA Times

As the recall of tainted pet food mushroomed into an international scandal, two of the largest U.S. food manufacturers put out a blanket order to their American suppliers: No more ingredients from China.

Chinese Imports nixed by key firms by USA Today
Menu Foods, North America's biggest maker of wet pet foods and the company that launched the pet food recall, is phasing out ingredients from China.
(Note: Royal Canin and The South African pet food institute already swore off Chinese imports - weeks ago.)


What else is being done:

Bayh asks Bush, FDA to restrict Chinese food, medicine imports (added 5:45pm)
The United States should yank away the “welcome” sign for many Chinese food and medicine ingredients, Sen. Evan Bayh, D-Ind., told President Bush and the head of the Food and Drug Administration in letters he sent Monday.

A proposal to consolidate federal food safety agencies is not as headline-driven as it may seem. From the LA Times

Lawmakers push for change in food safety oversight from cnn.com

Bill Allowing Civil Actions For Harm Caused By Tainted Pet Food Advances

ChemNutra Calls for Pet Food Ingredients Safety Summit July in Las Vegas (Okay, but we'd rather you not import food at all)


And finally, who not to believe:

The Pet Food Institute - read their latest at PR Week
...

Bush: What's your opinion of the media's handling of the situation?

Ekedahl: There were specific articles that were troublesome and bloggers who were off the charts.

[I'm proud to be one of those off-the-charts bloggers - if not for us lots more pets would be dead. So screw you Mr. Ekedahl.]

Want something to do? Per reader/contributor Mike's request - Email The Pet Food Institute - info@petfoodinstitute.org , feel free to copy Mike's words: Mr Ekedahl: Take a lesson from the courageous Pet Food Industry of South Africa and little Royal Canin -- 'swear off' the use of suspect ingredients from cheap foreign suppliers...


5 comments:

chinaimport said...

I don't think such a radical measure is necessary. Chinese imports are cheaper and not of a bad quality, they are useful for the population.

chinamarketplace said...

For China, this would be disastrous. The market place in China has developed only due to imports and exports. Trade agreements and relationships are what made it the 3rd economical power, after the US and Japan.

chinawholesaler said...

I don't see why to do so. Chinese imports aren't of a bad quality anymore. China is not only the biggest producer of wholesale goods. Industry, manufacturing, high-tech and not only are also developing. Research and development ( in order to improve their products) are also in attention for numerous large companies.

sourcingchina said...

I don't see why. After all, Sourcing from China is vital to the economy of China, but also to the economies of other countries whose biggest businesses recognize the benefits of importing goods and services directly from Chinese manufacturers and suppliers. Those businesses who source from China can offer as much as 60% savings over goods and services produced in Europe and America, and up to 20% savings over third-world suppliers.

Anonymous said...

My friend and I were recently discussing about how we as human beings are so hooked onto electronics. Reading this post makes me think back to that debate we had, and just how inseparable from electronics we have all become.


I don't mean this in a bad way, of course! Ethical concerns aside... I just hope that as memory gets cheaper, the possibility of copying our memories onto a digital medium becomes a true reality. It's one of the things I really wish I could see in my lifetime.


(Posted on Nintendo DS running [url=http://quizilla.teennick.com/stories/16129580/does-the-r4-or-r4i-work-with-the-new-ds]r4i dsi[/url] DS Fling)

Volunteers Needed! Get food off shelves...

howl911.com, itchmo.com, thepetfoodlist.com, petconnection.com, petfoodtracker.com and spockosbrain.com have joined together to ask for your help.
Update 6-10: Recalled food was purchased from a
California store on 5-29th – this stuff is still out there!
We need Volunteers to help get recalled food off store shelves. Read this post at Spocko’s Brain for instructions. Print a list (or two) on this site. Visit stores, then report safe stores here at Itchmo.com.

Printing Information:
1. Print the main FDA Pet Food Recall page http://www.fda.gov/oc/opacom/hottopics/petfood.html – this will be handy to show retailers who haven’t heard anything about the recall. (3 pages)

2. Print the list of 14 Major National Brands - it includes flavors and date information where applicable so you can tell if specific products for these brands have been recalled. The brands are: Alpo Prime Cuts, Chicken Soup for the Pet Lover’s Soul, Doctors Foster and Smith, Eukanuba, Gravy Train, Hill’s Science Diet, Iams, Jerky Treats, Lick Your Chops, Mighty Dog Pouches, Natural Balance, Nutro, Pounce, Royal Canin. (It’s 7 pages and includes FDA contact information.)

3. Print the List of All Brands – it will remind you what products have been recalled - but it does not give you date and flavor information, there is just too much to put in one document. (7 pages, but the 7th page is links to more detailed information so you don’t need to print it)

If you want, and are going to a store that you know has store brands that have been recalled (such as Walmart), go to that recall information at the links on the summary or at the FDA site and print it out. Some of the information is formatted in ways that make it difficult to read (one of the main reasons for this site), but it’s better than nothing.

Note: The FDA is the official source for all recall information and recalled products. This is an unofficial volunteer effort to help get the word out and get recalled foods off of shelves. We’re doing the best we can but can’t guarantee these lists are completely accurate. Again, here is the official recall site: http://www.fda.gov/oc/opacom/hottopics/petfood.html